Zarclonia's domain
amandaonwriting:

PHD Comics: The Neurobiology of Writing
littletogekissies:

Sorry I’ve been inactive! Something weird happened to me recently! Does anybody have any ideas on how to get these back on?

littletogekissies:

Sorry I’ve been inactive! Something weird happened to me recently! Does anybody have any ideas on how to get these back on?

starstrucklucky:

Awesome commission done by Archia 

starstrucklucky:

Awesome commission done by Archia 

foodffs:

Rainbow Dipped Ice Cream Cones
Really nice recipes. Every hour.
sinnohgirl:

線香花火 by 二ワ
kyoumado:

baSED OFF OF THIS

kyoumado:

baSED OFF OF THIS

Writing the Ending for Your Story

thedancingwriter:

As some of you already know, I just finished a book a few days ago titled The Glorious In-Between that contains two asexual, aromantic characters. It took me almost a week to write the ending. This has been true for every book I’ve ever written, from When Stars Die to The Stars Are Infinite.

I don’t know why endings are so difficult for me to write. It isn’t that I’m getting to the end of the book and I don’t want it to end, because I do want it to end! I desperately want to finish the dang draft! I just tend to slow down, and I can’t even explain why this is so. 

Endings are hard, regardless of whether or not you can blow through one in a day or drag yourself through the next couple of days trying to get that ending down. 

The book has to end, though. It has to tie up all loose threads (an exception can be made for books in a series) and end in a way that is both satisfying and unpredictable.

First, let me present the five types of endings:

  1. The happy ending
  2. The unhappy ending
  3. The tragic ending, wherein the protagonist does succeed at his/her objective but had to sacrifice something for it
  4. The sacrifice, wherein the protagonist sacrifices his/her objective for the greater good
  5. The bittersweet ending

If you know these five types of endings, you’ll at least be able to choose how you’d like to end your book, depending on the progression of your book. You don’t want to do an unhappy ending for the sake of an unhappy ending. The ending you choose has to make sense with everything that has occurred in your book. 

One thing that used to happen to me in the past is that I would write the draft of the book but not write the ending and let the draft cool. I’d write the ending in the revisions. That has worked for me, but it’s something I’m not interested in doing anymore. I just want to get the ending over with.

You can outline your ending in detail. I did not do that. I just wrote the ending by the seat of my pants. I binge wrote The Glorious In-Between, so it was exhausting having to outline it, too, at the same time. I’m not sure if this is going to happen with All Stars Align, which will be the title of the third book in The Stars Trilogy. I already know exactly how I want to end the third book, but that doesn’t mean the ending won’t be any less difficult for me to write. After all, I already knew how I wanted to end The Glorious In-Between before I even began outlining it. 

In any case, the best endings for any book are endings that leave the readers remembering that book. After all, everything can be great and fantastic, until you get to the ending. It doesn’t matter how much your reader loved your book before the ending. If the ending is poor, readers are going to finish your book with a bad taste in their mouths—and then most likely forget they ever read that book. 

You don’t want that to happen. 

Resonance with endings can occur through narration, dialogue, and description.

Here are some final tips for your ending:

  • Don’t introduce new characters or subplots. The ending of a book generally occurs in the last 30-50 pages, so there really is no time to introduce a new character or subplot. The only exception to this is if you’ve foreshadowed a character throughout the book and then put that character in those last 30-50 pages. Of course, I think I actually broke this rule with When Stars Die, when I do introduce a new character in the very last chapter. No readers have complained, of course, but it’s also an epilogue. 
  • Don’t spend too much time musing. Endings are generally fast-paced, because the ending is coming to a head, and you want the ending to have the most tension out of any part of your book, so you need to minimize descriptions.
  • Don’t change the tone. If the tone of your ending changes, it will sound tacked on to readers, like the chapter was a mere afterthought. 
  • Make sure your objective is strong. Your MC is after something, and that something needs to be made obvious in some way. Novels of a literary nature have some leeway on this, but other types of fiction really don’t. The MC is either going to achieve that objective in some way, or the MC is going to lose out on that objective.
  • Think of several possible endings. Don’t limit yourself to just one possible ending. Imagine as many as you can, and then choose the one that makes the most sense for your story. Although I knew how I wanted to end The Glorious In-Between, this doesn’t mean I stuck with the EXACT ending I had planned. I thought of several possible endings within the type of ending I wanted to do, and then as I came upon the ending, it occurred to me what type of ending would make more sense with how I’d written the story up to that point. So the ending must be in line with the story. It needs to make sense, and you don’t need to choose the easy way out. Readers are going to know otherwise if you do. 
burdge:

ok but hear me out- what about a lightning bolt scar that looked like real lightning?

burdge:

ok but hear me out- what about a lightning bolt scar that looked like real lightning?

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

naturalvirtue:

I must apologize for the rough quality and total lack of consistency and also for myself being rotten to the core.

It was a really fun livestream though! I really enjoyed drawing these! So I’m posting them as a thank you to all the people that come to chat a bit with me. I always have a good time!

dark-radiant-mind:

pregnantzombie:

note-a-bear:

chauvinistsushi:

sourcedumal:

boosabe:

spiritgun:

liftedandgiftedd:

3 people stealing the same bike [video]

smh…

entirely fed up with this world 

Damn….

Racism right here.

White people steal, and it’s BRUSHED OFF AND OTHER PEOPLE HELP

Black person? MOB of people come to attack him.

*lies down*

but it’s all in our heads though

This shit is infuriating

They helped the white girl steal it. Not just let her steal it, but HELPED her steal it.

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

megaivysaur:

Here, have a bouncy shiny and non shiny Dialga Pixels!

Dialga is a pain in the butt to draw, but I like how they came out in the end :) 

wrapyourselfaroundmyfinger:

jonny-poopoo-pants:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

For The First Time Ever, All Four Eyewitness Accounts of The Murder of Michael Brown Put In Chronological OrderThe most detailed side-by-side telling of each eyewitness account of the Mike Brown murder in chronological order #JusticeForMichaelBrown [@ShaunKing]

Reblog the fuck out of this

BOOST^^^^^^^